Book Recommendation: The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay

Iran

 

Let’s turn from home, where roses bloom in garden windows, to beyond, where life is … well, where it is not always what it seems. Or where it is not what some would like it to seem.

Iran. It’s been in the news.

We know to be cautious, afraid maybe, certainly concerned.

The world watches as countries such as North Korea and Iran build their nuclear capabilities. The world wonders what life is really like for the people living in these rather (rather?) closed countries.

Iran – Beyond Us? Or Near to Home?

Hooman Majd, grandson of an ayatollah, in his book The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay, answered some of my many questions about the people, the politics, the religious control of Iran and how that all works out in the real world.

Don’t let the relationship to his grandfather cause you to think he is going to pull punches. He doesn’t.

And don’t think what is happening in Iran is so terribly foreign to our own society. In some ways, it isn’t. I was nerve-impinging surprised.

Here is my Goodreads review:

The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay

The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay: An American Family in IranThe Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay: An American Family in Iran by Hooman Majd
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay: An American Family in Iran offers an insight into the culture, the political quagmires, the paradoxes of Iranian life.

I couldn’t help but think of the parallels between the United States of America and Iran.

Beginning with the pollution I grew up with in Los Angeles and that of Tehran to the fight for power of parties unclear in their purpose and path – nonetheless vying for power to control – even to America’s slide toward a police state and our (non-uniformed) morality police imposing cultural d’ruthers using a lower case “g” god as their scapegoat, ignoring the contextually valid truths of the one and only upper case God of the Bible.

Iranian people – including their leadership – have their paradoxes; I see that more clearly after reading this book.

But I also see the paradoxes in our own culture and I hope we take note of them before we slide too far toward the ways of the red, white and green.

View all my reviews

 

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